Dangerous Reflections in the Witching Hour


Should I note the internet makes far easier than it ought—nearly inevitable, when you take a moment to think about it, which either is or isn’t troublingα—to encounter a rather striking fusion of fast cars, allegedly glamorous women, and “Cigány Himnusz”, it might seem reasonable to wonder in turn how many people might ever find the idea of such a troika significant in any context.

Or perhaps that is naïve; I am an American, so the proper question is whether anyone has a clue what the question means.

Damn. Wrong punch line.

Er … ah … oh, right: Perhaps I am naïve; being American, I’m probably making far too big a deal out of it simply in noticing.

There would also seem to be a certain shade of irony present, but it’s almost scary. Or not. It’s probably an Americanism.

Never mind. Try it an action movie voice-over: Fast cars. Faster women. Cigány Himnusz. Oh. That’s right: Don’t.

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α No, really, there is fair debate about expectation and inevitability in the context of infinite or merely vastly overwhelming potential, i.e., compared to the Universe itself.

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The Skerik Story


Let us speak, then, of Skerik.

Yes, that Skerik.

So here’s the basic story: For whatever reason, my partner wanted to go hot tubbing, and, frankly, public baths were never really my thing. Yeah. Whatever. Go figure.

Skerik, performing live, undated.So as we walked from Wallingford to the U-District, we passed The Rainbow, and who should be on the bill but Crack freakin’ Sabbath?

Hot tubbing? Beer with Skerik? What, is this really a hard choice?

Something about body temperatures and sperm production, the amount of alcohol consumed, and so on.

We conceived our daughter after that show.

Yes. Really. Thank you very much.

So to some degree, it can be said that my daughter would never have been born without Skerik.

We’ve joked about it before, because it just annoys more prudish people in the family to hear the connection of this wonderful child to something that scares them like the idea of a “Crack Sabbath”, but yeah, at some point we have to admit that it really is true.

Thank you, Skerik. ‘Twas one of the stranger Valentine’s Days I’ve ever experienced, but also, in retrospect, the damn happiest of them all.

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Colyer, Troy. “Crack Sabbath | 02.14 & 02.15 | Seattle”. JamBase. 18 February 2002.

Dreamswipe


¿What the f@ck is that f@cking noise?Truth told, my problem with phone alarms, quite simply, is the difference between snooze and reset. But, still, yes, it’s something akin to answering a phone in a dream, which really ought to be a line in a pop song, except those bands are all gone, now. Would probably have gone over better than answering machine songs.

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Image credit: Detail of Randall Munroe, xkcd #1359.

I admit, this is surprising


All things considered, the numbers are surprising to me. Then again, I’m not hip, anymore.

The top-earning tours of 2010, from Pollstar via BBC:

  1. Bon Jovi, $201.1m
  2. AC/DC, $177m
  3. U2, $160.9m
  4. Lady Gaga, $133.6m
  5. Metallica, $110.1m
  6. Michael Buble, $104.2m
  7. Walking With Dinosaurs, $104.1m
  8. Paul McCartney, $93m
  9. The Eagles, $92.3m
  10. Roger Waters, $89.5m

Continue reading

Gorillas on fire (Did I get your attention?)


Jason Linkins at Huffington Post calls it “Todays Great Moment in Photojournalism”, and I make no critique on that either way. The image comes with Jason Schrieber‘s report for the New Hampshire Union Leader

Jason Schrieber - New Hampshire Union Leader - April 8, 2010

—and reminds me of a song:

The vision was a masterpiece of comic timing,
But you wouldn’t laugh at all.

And it goes beyond just that line. Five points for anyone who can tell us about the other half of the joke.

Last week in silly ….


Just call it one of those strange things. You know, like—

Rock band Led Zeppelin were labelled “old fashioned” and “unconvincing” by BBC producers when the group took part in a radio audition in 1969.

—”Say what?”

I mean, right. You know? Says the BBC:

Documents from the BBC’s archive reveal that producers invited the group to appear on a trial basis only and criticised their performance ….

One member of the 1969 audition panel said the band were “not for daytime radio – specialist listening only”, while another described them as “derivative” and “unconvincing”.

And, according to a third, the group had “an old-fashioned sound”.

Famous last words?

I mean, come on. It’s forty years later and nobody has really caught up. I can get that they didn’t go over well with a BBC listening panel in 1969, but really? Old fashioned? Derivative? There’s something ironic about that; I just can’t put my finger on it ….

So, yeah. Anyway. Today in self-generated headlines. Or, I guess, last Thursday. Whatever. Insert weak punch line here.