Accident and Obligation, or, F-Utility


Ambition is obligation.

No, really, this is hardly any manner of genius, but at the same time it seems worth noting explicitly. Call it some sort of multiphasic something or other. Still, as so much happens, perhaps I ought to write it down, yet the act is laborious and stylistic precisely, at least in part, because of ambition; and the most direct address of labor and futility only amounts to greater, or, at least, other and more complex, obligation accoriding to reframed ambition.

And say what we will about desire and suffering, but ambition, in function is obligation.

Frameworks are as frameworks will; that life is more than mere utility of accident is an article of faith. Our futility is our own choice to attend the word.

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Cryptically Plain? Cryptic Plainness? Cryptonormal? Never mind.


Detail of 'Relativity' by M.C. Escher, 1953.

I don’t know, maybe it seems cryptic, but that’s also kind of the point.

Simply: It is true that we notice certain aspects about other people because those aspects are important to us.

But then there are occasions when those aspects are so apparent, not noticing requires some deliberate effort.

To wit, if at some point one makes a deliberate, sustained, focused, and otherwise sufficient attempt to disrupt another, the other will eventually notice.

The only question remaining is why, or, perhaps more directly expressed: What do you require of me at this time?

Because nothing else, in that moment, exists anymore. Not what I was about, going to be about, or need to be about; only this. You now have my attention, what do you require?

Brother, Can You Spare an Answer?


Appetite: Electric Kamon with Haruko, just before dinner. (Detail of frame from FLCL episode 4, “Full Swing”)

Every once in a while a question occurs, and it’s true I only ask it in limited circumstances. Still, it persists, because I never have encountered an actual functional answer.

Okay, guys, work with me, here.

Why is female reproductive and urogenital anatomy an insult?

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